Organizational_Behavior_Ch12

Organizational_Behavior_Ch12 - Chapter 12 Emerging...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 12
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Emerging Leadership Perspectives Chapter at a Glance In Chapter 11, we covered Contemporary Leadership Approaches. In this chapter we cover Emerging Leadership Perspectives. Some of these are quite new. Others are recent extensions of contemporary approaches. Together, though, these emerging perspectives capture work that is still in the relatively early stages of development, regardless of its linkage to contemporary ap- proaches, which may or may not have been around for awhile. As you read Chapter 12, keep in mind these study topics. INTEGRATIVE LEADERSHIP Full-Range Leadership Theory (FRLT) Shared Leadership Cross-Cultural Leadership: Project GLOBE Strategic Leadership MORAL LEADERSHIP Ethical Leadership Authentic Leadership Servant Leadership Spiritual Leadership CHANGE LEADERSHIP Leaders as Change Agents Phases of Planned Change Planned Change Strategies Resistance to Change CHAPTER 12 STUDY GUIDE Great leaders walk the talk
Background image of page 2
W illiam L. Lennox Jr. is a lieutenant general and the superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in New York. He was commis- sioned as a lieutenant in 1971 and has served in a wide variety of field as- signments and staff posi- tions. In addition to his West Point bachelor’s de- gree, he has a master’s and PhD from Princeton. He is both the com- manding officer of West Point and its president. He considers himself to be more of a symbol than a commander of people or a place. West Point sym- bolizes duty, honor, coun- try, and his constituents have great expectations and let him know if they think it is moving away from these high standards. He takes very seriously the re- alization that he has to produce Army lieutenants who are capable of combat and of leading units immediately, and at the same time he must produce strategic leaders for the Army who will be needed 20 or 30 years in the future. He evaluates the Academy’s per- formance through cadet grades and per- formance in different areas; by surveying battalion commanders and junior officers of the newly commissioned officers; and by looking at such things as promotion rates, retention rates, and who is selected for com- mand. He sees the biggest challenges as the immedi- ate and long-term devel- opment of skills that will continue to change dra- matically from those for- merly needed. In addition, having strong values is more important than ever. When asked about a tradi- tion of excellence and the criticism of elitism, he ar- gues that excellence is the hallmark, and graduates ought to be able to succeed and do well on their own. Without using the term, General Lennox believes in contingency leader- ship—different behaviors for different sit- uations. He also believes the most important advice for senior executives is to think long term and prepare the next generation. As he says: “Skills and abili- ties change to meet new demands, but the values you develop in your youth will shape your entire life.” 1 “Skills and abil- ities change to
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/21/2010 for the course NA MGT 307 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 30

Organizational_Behavior_Ch12 - Chapter 12 Emerging...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online