Organizational_Behavior_Ch07

Organizational_Behavior_Ch07 - Chapter 7 Rewards and...

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Chapter 7
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Rewards and Performance Management Chapter at a Glance The old adage “what gets measured happens” rings very true. Chapter 7 ad- dresses motivation and rewards in a context of performance management. As you read Chapter 7, keep in mind these study topics . MOTIVATION AND REWARDS An Integrated Model of Motivation Intrinsic and Extrinsic Rewards Pay for Performance Pay for Skills Pay as Benefits PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Measurement Process Purposes of Performance Measurement Performance Measurement Criteria and Standards PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL Performance Appraisal Methods Who Does the Performance Appraisal? Measurement Errors in Performance Appraisal Steps for Improving Performance Appraisals CHAPTER 7 STUDY GUIDE What gets measured happens
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W ould you buy into this vision: high quality products and mini- mum impact on the environment? Some 1,275 employees at the outdoor clothing supplier Patagonia Inc. do. Says one MBA who turned down a job with a global giant to start as a stock handler at one of the firm’s Califor- nia stores: “I wanted to work for a company that’s driven by values.” And those values driving Patag- onia begin with the founder, Yvon Choutinard. “Most people want to do good things but don’t. At Patagonia,” he says, “it’s an essential part of your life.” The firm’s stated mission is: “Build the best product, do no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire, and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.” And Choutinard understands that it all happens through people. Stop into its headquarters in Ventura, California, and you will find on-site day care and full medical benefits for all employees—full-time and part-time alike. In return, Choutinard expects the best: hard work and high performance achieved through creativity and collabo- ration. And he refuses to grow the firm too fast, preferring to keep things manageable so that values and vision are well served. At a time when polls report that many Ameri- cans are losing or feeling less passion for their jobs because of high stress, bad bosses, and unmoti- vating jobs, Patagonia of- fers something different. Although employees are well paid and get the lat- est in bonus packages, the firm doesn’t focus on money as the top reward. Its most popular perk is the “green sabbati- cal”—time off, with pay, to work for en- vironmental causes. Says one of those who succeeded in landing a job where there are 900 resumes for every open po- sition: “It’s easy to go to work when you get paid to do what you love to do.” 1 “It’s easy to go to work when you get paid to do what you love to do.” 150 Motivation and Rewards The motivation theories and job design approaches discussed in the last two chapters all deal, in one way or another, with the rewards people get from their work and how these rewards impact performance. Now it is time to discuss how these multiple ideas and perspectives can be linked together in a context of performance management. An Integrated Model of Motivation
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This note was uploaded on 03/21/2010 for the course NA MGT 307 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Organizational_Behavior_Ch07 - Chapter 7 Rewards and...

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