Organizational_Behavior_Ch06

Organizational_Behavior_Ch06 - Chapter 6 Motivation and Job...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Motivation and Job Design Chapter at a Glance It’s not always easy, but creating a good person-job fit has a big performance im- pact. Chapter 6 extends the study of motivation into job designs, technology, and alternative work schedules. As you read, keep in mind these study topics . JOB-DESIGN APPROACHES Scientific Management Job Enlargement and Job Rotation Job Enrichment DESIGNING JOBS TO INCREASE MOTIVATION Job Characteristics Model Social Information Processing Practical Questions and Answers TECHNOLOGY AND JOB DESIGN Automation and Robotics Flexible Manufacturing Systems Electronic Offices Workflow and Process Reengineering ALTERNATIVE WORK ARRANGEMENTS Compressed Work Weeks Flexible Working Hours Job Sharing Telecommuting Part-Time Work CHAPTER 6 STUDY GUIDE It’s about person-job fit
Background image of page 2
I magine a job like this—no problem taking personal time during normal work hours, able to start and quit at times convenient for you, few mandatory meetings, able to work from home. It’s not fiction; it’s a fact at Best Buy, where the firm’s ROWE (short for Results- Only Work Environment) program has changed the rules for many staffers at the firm’s Minneapolis headquarters. Business Week calls it a post-geo- graphic workplace that gives people the freedom “to work wherever they want, whenever they want, as long as they get their work done.” It’s an output-focused and results- oriented, not a rules-driven culture. So, how does it work? Well, great, if you ask those partici- pating. Chad Achen, online order man- ager, has been known to leave early for a movie matinee; Kelly McDevitt, online promotions manager, leaves in the early afternoon to pick her son up from school; Mark Wells, e-learning specialist, sleeps late whenever he wants. And it’s also great if you look at the numbers. Voluntary turnover decreased from be- tween 52 percent and 90 percent among divisions adopting ROWE; average pro- ductivity increased by 35 percent. Senior Vice President J. T. Thompson became a believer. “For years . . . I was always looking to see if people were here,” he says. “I should have been looking at what they were getting done.” For her part, Cari Ressler, a co- sponsor of ROWE and a human resource manager, says: “The old way of managing and looking at work isn’t going to work anymore. We want to revolutionalize the way work gets done.” But naysayers exist too. One letter writer responded to the Business Week ar- ticle with this comment: “The lack of fixed schedules at Best Buy cannot exist in the long term in a competitive global econ- omy.” Another asks: “Can you design metrics that measure the effect of one member needing a quick answer from an- other and having to chase them down be- cause they don’t know whether they’re going to be in the office or at a movie?” 1 “The old way of managing and looking at work isn’t going to work anymore.” 130 Job-Design Approaches When you think about the Best Buy example, you have to realize that such flex-
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Organizational_Behavior_Ch06 - Chapter 6 Motivation and Job...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online