Study Guides - Study Guide Chapter 11 Questions: 1. What is...

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Study Guide Chapter 11 Questions: 1. What is suffrage and how did it expand over the course of U.S. history? Make sure to know the important groups affected and the approximate time in which it took place, particularly amendments or laws associated with these expansions. Suffrage-right to vote Universal suffrage for white men was not fully achieved until the 1840s 19 th amendment (1920)- women right to vote 26 th amendment (1971)- voting age to 18 14 th /15 th amendments (1968)- reduce discrimination at the polls, encourage AA to vote. 2. Who votes and why? People vote because it gives leaders a reason to care about people’s interests, opinions, and values. People don’t vote because they think that individually they don’t matter. However, when totaled up, they do matter. 3. What factors (both individual and institutional) are likely to increase turnout? Decrease turnout? Individual -Age and education (most) **went over in lecture** 4. How do voters decide how they are going to vote? They rely heavily on free information from news media, campaign advertising, opinion leaders, and own experience. 5. What is the Motor Voter Law? Why is it important? 6. What is performance voting? Voting for the party in control “in” when one thinks party is performing well “out” when party is performing poorly 7. What is issue voting? Typical positions of Republicans and Democrats differ in predictable ways on many issues. 8. What is party identification and why is it important? The best single predictor of the vote in federal elections.
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9. What are the basic components of a campaign? Candidate, a message, a way to inform voters about both 10. What is a focus group? - A small number of ordinary citizens are observed as they talk with each other about political candidates, issues, and events - Used by presidential campaign to test general themes and advertisements to promote themes. 11. When might a potential candidate decide NOT to run for office? 12. What is negative campaigning? Pointed personal criticism of the other candidate 13. What is campaign finance reform? (FECA 1971/1974 and Buckley v. Valeo , Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act) 14. What is soft money? Money used by political parties for voter registration, public education, and voter mobilization 15. What do candidates spend money on? Electronic media advertising, fundraising, persuasion mail, speeches, rallies, etc. AND Overhead—salaries, furniture, etc 16. In presidential elections, what is the strategy for allocating campaign money? - Concentrate on states that polls indicate could go either way. - Ignore states locked up by either side. 17. What is public financing of elections, and why is it controversial? Terms: Access - the ability of privileged outsiders, such as interest group representatives, to obtain a hearing from elected officials or bureaucrats Candidate- a person who is running for elected office
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Coordinated spending- spending by the democratic and republican party committees on behalf of individual congressional candidates.
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2010 for the course POLS 1101 taught by Professor Cann during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Study Guides - Study Guide Chapter 11 Questions: 1. What is...

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