AcademicArg

AcademicArg - Academic Argument An academic argument must...

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Unformatted text preview: Academic Argument An academic argument must do each of the following things: (1) Identify a problem (2) Propose a solution Academic arguments make problems; they show readers they have problems that need to be solved. What keeps them from being annoying is that they give solutions to the problems they identify, solutions that will benefit their readers. They solve problems that their readers didn’t know they had. There are two types of academic problems: Tangible Problems have practical consequences for the reader that are measured quantitatively. An argument based on a tangible problem will attempt to persuade its readers that they should do something in a different way from how they had been doing it. For example, such an argument might identify some problem with the kinds of mouse-traps its readers are using. It might then point out how many fewer mice those traps are catching than they could be if they were constructed in a more...
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2010 for the course ENWR 110 taught by Professor Weckstein during the Spring '08 term at UVA.

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AcademicArg - Academic Argument An academic argument must...

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