hellenistic_art06 - Greek culture becomes gradually culture...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–28. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hellenistic Art Hellenistic>Hellas=Greece in Greek>adjective: Hellenic=Greek (19 th c. coinage)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Alexander (
Background image of page 4
Historical Background 333-323: Alexander establishes a vast empire spreading Hellenism (Greek culture) as far as Ai-Khanoum (Afganistan) and the Indus river 323-146 : Hellenistic Kingdoms: Egypt (Ptolemaic), Syria (Seleucid), Pergamon (Attalids), Macedonia (always fight each other)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Alex’s conquests expanded Greek culture all the way to India
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hellenistic Culture: open horizons or BCE globalism Hellenistic versus Hellenic Cosmopolitanism (Delos, Alexandreia, Antioch) Retrospective attitudes (Classicism ) Cult of ruler and state (Alexander) Development of scholarship and science: development of libraries (philology, history, math, engineering, medicine)
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 22
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 24
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 26
Background image of page 27

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 28
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Greek culture becomes gradually culture of the book Art and architecture explore boundaries of human imagination. PERGAMON NW Asia Minor (Turkey) theatricality Theatricality: e.g. Altar of Zeus at Pergamon Gigantomachy: a cosmic passionate drama Exaggeration and passion Dying Gaul (Pergamon, Attalos I, late 3d c. BCE) Playfulness, the bizarre and the paradox Playfulness-Preoccupation with the bizarre and the paradox or grotesque sensuality Sensuality (Venus=Aphrodite, de Milo) ca mid 2 nd c. BCE and her predecessor (Praxiteles nude Knidia) Cf. and Contrast with Age of Parthenon Playfulness Extreme intellectualism Emphasis on the bizarre and the paradox Sensationalist Penchant for the grotesque Theatrical...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/23/2010 for the course ARH 302 taught by Professor Dontremember during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 28

hellenistic_art06 - Greek culture becomes gradually culture...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 28. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online