Lecture 1 - ME 601: Manufacturing in Micro- and Nanosystems...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ME 601: Manufacturing in Micro- and Nanosystems Lecture 1: Course Overview, Scaling, and What is Nanotechnology?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Defining Micro- and Nanomanufacturing Many conventional manufacturing operations depend on controlling properties at the micro- and nanoscale (surface roughness, microstructure of metallic alloys) Micro- and nanomanufacturing (fabrication) creates *entire components* with features on that size scale Cui classifies technologies into three categories: planar technology, probing technology, and molding technology
Background image of page 2
Scaling from Nano to Micro to Macro Simple molecules <1nm Intel Core Microprocessor 263 mm 2 820×10 6 transistors Semiconductor Nanocrystal ~1 nm 10 -10 10 -5 10 -9 10 -7 10 -6 10 -8 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 m Circuit design Copper wiring width 0.1 μ m red blood cell ~5 μ m DNA proteins nm bacteria 1 μ m Nanotube Transistor (Dekker) SOI transistor width 0.12 μ m diatom 30 μ m Joe Jacobson @ MIT
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A Slightly More Whimsical View Coutesy of Charles Tahan, UW MRSEC
Background image of page 4
Planar Processing Earliest developed and most commonly used micro/nanofabrication technology Features fabricated indirectly over large areas using light, ions, or electrons (no direct contact between tool and part) -> massively parallel manufacturing Major limitation: can only form two-dimensional structures, or quasi-3D structures via layer-by-layer fabrication Entire system is fabricated in parallel (vs. conventional manufacturing: fabricate parts and then assemble them) A large number of processing steps are carried out sequentially (ex: oxidation, etching, metallization, ion implantation), requires very clever design of process to get the desired functionality
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fabrication with Probes Extension of mechanical processing to micro/nanoscale Include contact-based approaches (solid probes) such as atomic force microprobes and non-contact approaches such as ion beams, electron beams, lasers Essentially a serial manufacturing operation: probe is raster scanned across workpiece, similar to conventional machining Æ serial vs. parallel Scale down to nanoscale allows integration of physical and chemical processes
Background image of page 6
Molding Technologies Replication technology using pre-fabricated molds with features over a wide range of size scales Similar to planar processing but requires direct mechanical contact over large areas Most common example in nanofabrication: nanoimprint lithography (NIL) NIL uses stamps with nanoscale features to transfer a pattern to a polymeric substrate Requires a single master that can be used over and over again, significantly lowers manufacturing cost
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fundamentally new paradigm for nanoscale manufacturing Engineers structures at the molecular level, therefore known as “bottom-up” approach Has potential to result in significant cost savings Includes techniques for producing structures patterned at the nanoscale as well as the assembly of micro- and nanoscale
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/23/2010 for the course MATERIAL S 601 taught by Professor Samual during the Spring '10 term at University of Wisconsin.

Page1 / 37

Lecture 1 - ME 601: Manufacturing in Micro- and Nanosystems...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online