_5 Fatigue2010

_5 Fatigue2010 - 2/2/2010 Fatigue & Exercise metabolism...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2/2/2010 1 Fatigue & Exercise metabolism review In order to understand fuel intake needs (i.e. nutrition), need to understand what is being used for various activities/sports FATIGUE Inability to maintain performance Muscle contraction depends on ATP availability [ATP] will fuel about 2 s of maximal effort So, need tremendous ability to regenerate ATP If ATP drops, cannot generate same work rate (fatigue) Three systems to generate ATP ± Phosphagen system (ATP-PC system) ± Anaerobic glycolysis ± Aerobic system Phosphagen (ATP-PC system) ± Immediate source of ATP PC + ADP ATP + C Creatine kinase Quick but low capacity Glycolysis: Energy Investment Phase
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/2/2010 2 Glycolysis: Energy Generation Phase Production of Lactic Acid ± With aerobic metabolism, O 2 is available in the mitochondria to accept H + (and electrons) from NADH produced in glycolysis ± In anaerobic metabolism, H + and electrons from NADH are accepted by pyruvic acid to form lactic acid With aerobic metabolism, pyruvate converted to AcCoA Enter Kreb’s cycle (TCA cycle) ± 2 (for later conversion to ATP) ± Produces some ATP directly The Krebs Cycle 3. Electron transport system ± Electrons removed from NADH and FADH are passed along a series of carriers to produce ATP (Oxidative phosphorylation) ± H + from NADH and FADH are accepted by O 2 to form water Formation of ATP in the Electron Transport Chain
Background image of page 2
2/2/2010 3 SUM: Aerobic metabolism Note original fuel can be fat, CHO, aa Control of Bioenergetics ± Rate-limiting enzymes ± regulate (stimulate or inhibit) the rate of a metabolic reaction ± Co-factors sometimes required (e.g. vitamins, minerals) ± modifiers might include: ATP, ADP, Ca, product of a reaction, etc. ± Anaerobic: ± ATP-CP (Phosphagen): ATP,CP ± Anaerobic glycolysis: blood glucose Knowing which energy systems are providing ATP helps us know which fuels are likely being used blood glucose, glycogen ± Aerobic:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

_5 Fatigue2010 - 2/2/2010 Fatigue & Exercise metabolism...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online