BIO311C_S10_Chapter_16 - DNA structure and replication...

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DNA structure and replication Chapter 16 (pages 305-316) Relevant parts
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What we will cover Experiments done to show DNA was the genetic material Review DNA structure Different types of replication Experiments to show semiconservative replication Mechanism of replication Enzymes in replication
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Evidence That DNA Can Transform Bacteria Frederick Griffith was studying Streptococcus pneumoniae A bacterium that causes pneumonia in mammals He worked with two strains of the bacterium A pathogenic strain (Smooth) and a nonpathogenic strain (Rough) 1928
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Griffith experiment Fig. 6.3 b Genetics: from genes to genomes (Hartwell)
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Subsequent experiments suggested that the causative agent: DNA Transformation: The ability of foreign DNA to change the genetic characteristics of an organism
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Fig. 16-4-3 EXPERIMENT Phage DNA Bacterial cell Radioactive protein Radioactive DNA Batch 1: radioactive sulfur ( 35 S) Batch 2: radioactive phosphorus ( 32 P) Empty protein shell Phage DNA Centrifuge Centrifuge Pellet Pellet (bacterial cells and contents) Radioactivity (phage protein) in liquid Radioactivity (phage DNA) in pellet http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/olc/dl/120076/bio21.swf
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Building a structural model of DNA
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Erwin Chargaff fyi
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Chargaff’s rule The amount of Adenine equals the amount of Thymine The amount of Guanine equals the amount of Cytosine
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The Watson-Crick Model: DNA is a double helix 1951 – James Watson learns about x-ray diffraction pattern projected by DNA Knowledge of the chemical structure of nucleotides Erwin Chargaff’s experiments demonstrate that ratio of A and T are 1:1, and G and C are 1:1 1953 – James Watson and Francis crick propose their double helix model of DNA structure
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Figure 16.7a, c C T A A T C G G C A C G A T A T A T T A C T A 0.34 nm 3.4 nm (a) Key features of DNA structure G 1 nm G (c) Space-filling model T http://biocrs.biomed.brown.edu/Books/Chapters/Ch%208/DH-Paper.html
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Fig. 16-7a Hydrogen bond 3 end 5 end 3.4 nm 0.34 nm 3 end 5 end (b) Partial chemical structure (a) Key features of DNA structure 1 nm
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DNA replication
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BIO311C_S10_Chapter_16 - DNA structure and replication...

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