Chapter6_4of4 - 1 Aug. 19, 2005, ANGLETON, Texas - A Texas...

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Jurors in the semi-rural county rejected Merck’s argument that Robert Ernst, 59, died of clogged arteries rather than a Vioxx-induced heart attack that led to his fatal arrhythmia. Ernst, a produce manager at a Wal-Mart store, ran marathons and taught aerobics classes on the side. Merck said it plans to appeal. After news of the late-afternoon decision, Merck shares fell 7.7 percent to close at $28.06, wiping away almost $5.2 billion in market capitalization. Aug. 19, 2005, ANGLETON, Texas - A Texas jury found pharmaceutical giant Merck liable Friday for the death of a man who took the once-popular painkiller Vioxx, awarding his widow $253.4 million in damages in the first of thousands of lawsuits pending across the country. . But the damage award is likely to be drastically cut to no more than $26.1 million because Texas law caps the punitive damages that made up the bulk of the total. The jury awarded $450,000 in economic damages for Ernst’s lost pay, $24 million for mental anguish and loss of companionship and $229 million in punitive damages. .But the punitive damage amount is likely to be reduced since state law caps punitive damages at twice the amount of economic damages — lost pay — and up to $750,000 on top of non-economic damages, which are comprised of mental anguish and loss of companionship.
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What if I buy coffee at drive-thru, set it between my legs, spill it, sue and jury awards me a gazillion?
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Employer says you’re a woman so you get 10% less than the going rate: you win sex discrimination suit WAL-MART SEX DISCRIMINATION SUIT TO PROCEED Oct. 21, 2003 A lawsuit charging Wal-Mart with sex discrimination will move forward, a federal judge decided Tuesday, making it the largest private civil rights case in U.S. history. The lawsuit accuses Wal-Mart, the nation's largest private employer, of paying its female employees less than male workers who held the same jobs and bypassed women for promotions. U.S. District Judge Martin Jenkins in San Francisco certified the suit of roughly 1.6 million women who worked for Wal-Mart's U.S. stores since Dec. 26, 1998
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National Enquirer say that you are married to an alien, you sue and are awarded $1 million
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Jury awards woman $2.2B in diluted drug case KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A jury awarded $2.2 billion Thursday to a cancer patient whose pharmacist watered down her chemotherapy drugs. Georgia Hayes was the first of the more than 400 lawsuits against former pharmacist Robert R. Courtney.
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2010 for the course ACCT 402 taught by Professor Toleno during the Spring '10 term at Providence College.

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Chapter6_4of4 - 1 Aug. 19, 2005, ANGLETON, Texas - A Texas...

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