Lecture7 F08 given - Lecture 7 Organic Chemistry I Prof....

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Organic Chemistry I 310/318M Pre-Health Professionals Unique numbers: 54410, 54435, 54440, 54445, and 54655 Prof. Jonathan L. Sessler Lecture 7
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Combining VB & MO Theories • VB theory views bonding as arising from electron pairs localized between adjacent atoms. These pairs create bonds. • Further, organic chemists commonly pre-add atomic orbitals (AOs) to create (and then use!) hybridized AOs (choice of sp 3 , sp 2 , and sp ) that match the experimentally observed geometries. • The big question then is with these hybrid MOs in hand, how do we make orbitals that contain electrons that reside between adjacent atoms? • For this, we turn back to MO theory.
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Combining VB & MO Theories • To create orbitals that are localized between adjacent atoms, we add and subtract the atomic orbitals on the adjacent atoms, which are aligned to overlap with each other. • Recall, that this combination is only possible if the starting orbitals are of the correct symmetry, and works best if they are close in energy. • This math takes place, whether or not we add electrons to the orbitals, but only has meaning once we do. Again, think stadium seats and spectators!
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Combining VB & MO Theories • Figure 1.17 Molecular orbital mixing diagram for creation of any C-C σ bond. Here, we are looking at one part of a hybrid orbital ( sp 3 , sp 2 , or sp ) interacting with another hybrid orbital.
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• Consider methane, CH 4 . The sp 3 hybrid orbitals of carbon each point to a 1 s orbital of hydrogen and, therefore, we add and subtract these atomic orbitals to create molecular orbitals.
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Lecture7 F08 given - Lecture 7 Organic Chemistry I Prof....

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