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CLAY - CLAY PRESENTED BY ECE CESUR 05068059 1.0 CLAY IN...

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CLAY PRESENTED BY ECE CESUR 05068059
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24/03/10 2 1.0 CLAY IN HISTORY The first clay gained from volcanic ashes. Natives in Central Africa and the Aborgines in Australia have used clay in their food. They used clay for combating dysentery and food infections. American Indians used clay as face mask of a proud warrior, paint for a ceremonial dancer.
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24/03/10 3 1.0 CLAY IN HISTORY By Indian tradition, a violated maiden would go outskirts and eat clay to restore her virginity. Today, modern scientific research enables us to determine the geographic zone where the clay minerals’ evoluation began and its benefits to the human body.
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24/03/10 4 2.0 TYPES OF CLAY The major mineral groups are Kaolin Smectite Illite Chlorite Hormite
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24/03/10 5 2.0 TYPES OF CLAY These clay minerals are identified by several techniques such as X-ray Diffraction Differential Thermal Analysis Electron Microscopy Infrared Spectrometry
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24/03/10 6 X-ray Diffraction Machine
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24/03/10 7 Differential Thermal Analysis
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24/03/10 8 Electron Microscopy
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24/03/10 9 Infrared Spectrometry
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24/03/10 10 2.1 KAOLIN Kaolin is used interchangeably with the term china clay. Kaolin is derived from the Chinese word ‘kauling’, meaning high ridge. Kaolin name is being used since 1867. The kaolin minerals have the composition: 2 3 2 2 2 . . 0 2 SiO O Al H
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24/03/10 11 Structure of Kaolinite
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24/03/10 12 2.2 SMECTITE Only smectite can absorb toxins because of its structural uniqueness. The principle clay mineral composing bentonite is smectite. The name bentonite is derived from the Fort Benton series of rocks in Wyoming where it was first found.
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24/03/10 13 2.2 SMECTITE In commerce, it is used with ‘montmorillonite’ name. Montmorillonite is shaped like a credit card!! One gram of this clay has a surface area of 800 square meters, ten football fields!!
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24/03/10 14 Structure of Smectite
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24/03/10 15 2.3 ILLITE Illite is a general term for the micalike clay mineral. The basic structural unit is a layer composed of two silica tetrahedral sheets and a central octahedral sheet.
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24/03/10 16 Structure of Illite
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24/03/10 17 2.4 CHLORITE The structure of chlorite minerals consists of alternate mica layers and brucite layers. The brucite-like layer can be magnesium, aluminum, or iron hydroxide, or a combination of all three.
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24/03/10 18 Structure of Chlorite
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24/03/10 19 2.5 HORMITE The hormite clay minerals have a chainlike structure. These minerals (palygorskite, sepiolite) consist of double silica tetrahedral chains linked together by octahedral oxygen and hydroxyl groups containing aluminum and magnesium ions.
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24/03/10 20 Structure of Palygorskite
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  • Winter '08
  • ÖZCANBEşERGIL
  • Clay Minerals Society of Japan, European Clay Minerals Society, Australian Clay Minerals Society, Clay Minerals Society

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