chicago - CHICAGO Style Citation Guide Chicago Style is...

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CHICAGO Style Citation Guide Chicago Style is used for academic writing in history, and some humanities courses, and requires both endnotes and a bibliography. The examples below are for a bibliography with some examples for endnotes. Most citations include three key elements: (1) author’s name, (2) title or source, and (3) publication information. ± Italicize titles. ± Follow elements with a period and one space. ± Additional elements such as number of volumes, edition numbers, or Web address may be required. ± For the bibliography, the first line of each citation starts at the left margin; indent 5 spaces before the second and any succeeding lines. List each source separately and arrange alphabetically by the author's last name (use the title if there is no author). ± For endnotes, the first line is indented five spaces. The note number is not raised, and it is followed by a period. Author's names are not inverted, but use the last name only to refer to an earlier note by the same author. An example of a note is included for one source in each section below. ± Refer to the latest edition of the Chicago Manual of Style and/or the Chicago Style Web site ( http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/cmosfaq/cmosfaq.html ) about Electronic reference formats. ANATOMY OF A CHICAGO CITATION Place of publication Below is a citation for a book with an editor. Consult the title page and the back of the title page for citation information. Other types of materials require different elements, such as article title and issue date for periodicals; and URL and date of access for anything accessed on the Web. Follow the examples in this guide to format citations according to the type of information you are citing. Date of publication Grossman, John, ed. The Chicago Manual of Style . 15th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003. Editor Title in italics Edition. Include if 2 nd or later Publisher BOOKS By a single author: Moran, Theodore H. Beyond Sweatshops: Foreign Direct Investment and Globalization in Developing Countries. Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 2002. 1. Theodore Moran, Beyond Sweatshops: Foreign Direct Investment and Globalization in Developing Countries (Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 2000), 24-25. Two authors: Christianse, John B., and Irene W. Leigh. Cochlear Implants in Children: Ethics and Choices . Washington, D.C: Gallaudet UP, 2002. 2. John B. Christianse and Irene W. Leigh, Cochlear Implants in Children: Ethics and Choices (Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet UP, 2002), 45-46. Three authors: Venolia, Jean P., Georgio Cordini, and Joseph Hitchcock. What Makes a Literary Masterpiece . Chicago: Hudson, 1995. Four or more authors (or editors) Sechzer, J.A., S.M. Pfaffilin, F.L. Denmark, A. Griffin, and S.J. Blumenthal, eds. 1996. Women and Mental Health
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2010 for the course CSC121 123 taught by Professor Bagley during the Spring '09 term at The University of British Columbia.

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chicago - CHICAGO Style Citation Guide Chicago Style is...

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