CRT 205 Chapter Two Notes Week 2

CRT 205 Chapter Two Notes Week 2 - CRT 205 Chapter Two...

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CRT 205 Chapter Two Notes Week 2 Vagueness The single most common form of unclear thinking or writing is excessive vagueness. A vague statement is one whose meaning is indistinct, imprecise, or lacks details. For example, when you are trying to find someone’s house and it is late and the directions you have been given include something like “Go down the road a ways to the turn and you’ll be there.” Ambiguous Claims A sentence that is subject to more than one interpretation is said to be ambiguous rather than vague. For example, “The average price of a house in Monterey is $995,000” is ambiguous, because the word “average,” as we just mentioned, has more than one meaning. Three types of Ambiguity Semantic Ambiguity First, if a claim is ambiguous because it contains an ambiguous word or phrase, it is said to be a semantic ambiguity. Consider the following examples: The average price of a house in Monterey is $995,000. Calhoun always lines up on the right side. Jessica is cold. I know a little Italian. Terry disputed their claim. Aunt Amy does not use glasses. Semantic ambiguity can be eliminated by substituting an unambiguous word or phrase, such as “eyeglasses” for “glasses” in the last item, or adding a clarifying phrase, such as “of the room” to the end of the second item. Syntactic Ambiguity
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2010 for the course CRT 205 taught by Professor N/a during the Winter '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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CRT 205 Chapter Two Notes Week 2 - CRT 205 Chapter Two...

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