Task 3 - C489 Nicki Neff (3).docx - Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Task 3 C489 Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership WGU C489

Task 3 - C489 Nicki Neff (3).docx - Organizational Systems...

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Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Task 3 - C489 1 Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership WGU - C489 Task 3 Nicki Neff February 27, 202
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Organizational Systems and Quality Leadership Task 3 - C489 2 The country I chose to compare healthcare to the United States is Germany. Germany and the United States’ healthcare system are alike in some ways, but different in others. In both healthcare systems, they each spend a substantial amount of governmental revenue on healthcare, but somehow manage to have lower life expectancy when compared to other countries. The vast majority of Germany’s healthcare costs are covered by approximately 160 nonprofit insurance collectives known as, “sickness funds”. These funds cover every German resident with a standard set of benefits, procedures, and medications. Employers pay half the cost of their sickness fund insurance, and the employee pays the other half. The German government absorbs the cost for the unemployed and children. As of 2013, medications are capped at 2% of income, and 1% of income for people with chronic diseases. Spending growth for medications in the United States has dramatically increased in comparison to Germany. Money for medications spent in the United States equates to double the amount that Germany is now spending. German residents rarely go into debt due to medical bills, because the German government limits out of pocket expenses. Germany actually pioneered this insurance type under the direction and leadership of Otto von Bismarck. Otto von Bismarck was a German diplomat who was largely responsible for the creation of the German Empire in 1871. The Bismarck Model of 1883 used an insurance system that was financed by employers and deducted from employee payroll. The Bismarck model, unlike the United States, cover all Germans, and are not for profit. The principle of “social solidarity” held the German government responsible in providing medical insurance, unemployment insurance, maternity benefits, social welfare, old age pensions, and disability payments.
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