revised - Running head: CHILD LABOR IS CHILD ABUSE 1 Child...

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Running head: CHILD LABOR IS CHILD ABUSE 1 Child Labor is Child Abuse: Implications on Children Lamya Mahmoud American University of Sharjah Final draft- revised essay
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CHILD LABOR IS CHILD ABUSE 2 Child Labor is Child Abuse: Implications on Children Yesterday, today, and hopefully not tomorrow, children are victims of child labor abusers who seek only profits and hold no mercy. Factory owners and employers are not the only guilty party, nonetheless, parents are also responsible for the miserable experience their children go through. Unfortunately, children are sufferers of careless, irresponsible and senseless parents. Imagine a child spending his supposedly fun childhood in factories, farms or mines, drown in sweat and dirt and exposed to hazardous chemicals and machines. Those poor children have no other choice but risking their lives and health for the sake of making a living. It is heartbreaking to see children’s rights taken away from them and therefore the incidence of child labor should come to an end. Child laborers could be taken advantage of in child labor market or forced to work in a family business to support their families. Either way they should not be the wall that we lean on. The phenomenon of child labor initially appeared in South Asia, though debates were advocated by Western countries (Thijs, 2000, p.5). Much of these debates were settled to protect the future generations and to guarantee a better life for children. Despite the fact that minimum age laws were imposed to specify a certain age for children to work, child labor continues to rise. In fact, there are many possible reasons why children work. For instance, poor families rely on their children to provide an extra source of income. Likewise, parents might be disabled, paralyzed or even dead and children will be forced to work and hold the full responsibility. Child labor is common in poor countries, particularly in rural areas, because children of poor families are expected to contribute to the family’s income. As
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CHILD LABOR IS CHILD ABUSE 3 Herath and Sharma explain, “Many South Asian countries depend heavily on agriculture . . . . and child labor is a pre-requisite in the family’s farm” (2007, p. 5). Therefore, it would not be surprising to see children working and handling difficult manual labor. Briefly, under harsh circumstances children might be obliged to work if they have no other choice for survival. Ultimately, child labor does not only violate child rights and exposes them to violence and abuse, but it is also considered exploitative. For this purpose, child labor should
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2010 for the course WRI WRI 102 taught by Professor Najla during the Spring '10 term at American University in Bulgaria.

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revised - Running head: CHILD LABOR IS CHILD ABUSE 1 Child...

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