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China One Child Policy 1 ‘One Child Policy’ should be Universal: WRI 102: Argumentative essay Professor Al Merabi October 17, 2009
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China One Child Policy 2 China One Child Policy: Population density is one of the most effective measures of a nations’ well-being, however it’s a subjective measure. Think of these two correlated phenomenon as a parabola, as one increases the other one increase too, until a certain point where they no longer directly correlate. In theory, as population growth blow up the country’s welfare rises, until it starts declining with the continuous rise in population growth. This gives us an idea why some countries zoom ahead while other countries lag behind. Let’s consider China, one of the most populous nations, were the government introduced the one child policy in the late 90’s which restricts couples not to have more than one child. Obviously, they were attempting to improve the country’s economic and social standards through the birth-control strategy. Was this policy convenient to the government’s expectations? In fact, it was. Therefore, this policy should be a universal law because despite the fact that it curbs population growth, it actually benefits individuals’ living standards as it promotes progression in both the educational and medical sectors, as well as raising income per-capita. Moreover, although specialists are not yet certain about the correlation between population growth and economic development, but in most cases it’s a negative correlation. It’s crystal clear that a typical family’s income increase as the number of children in that family decrease. To be more precise, the family’s income doesn’t actually increase , however, the family’s expenditures decrease so they save more and thus enjoy greater prosperity. This applies to families in urban areas; while families in rural areas does not benefit from this policy. In reality, families in countryside, especially in
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China One Child Policy 3 undeveloped societies, prefer to have many children because they are engaged in agricultural works and ought to help in raising their family’s income (White, 2000, p. 102). For this purpose, this explains why usually families in countryside are bigger than
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