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Tutorial.01 - TUTORIAL 1 XP CREATING AN XML DOCUMENT New...

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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 1 XP TUTORIAL 1 CREATING AN XML DOCUMENT
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 2 XP INTRODUCING XML XML stands for Extensible Markup Language. A markup language specifies the structure and content of a document. Because it is extensible, XML can be used to create a wide variety of document types.
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 3 XP INTRODUCING XML XML is a subset of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) which was introduced in the 1980s. SGML is very complex and can be costly. These reasons led to the creation of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), a more easily used markup language. XML can be seen as sitting between SGML and HTML easier to learn than SGML, but more robust than HTML.
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 4 XP THE LIMITS OF HTML HTML was designed for formatting text on a Web page. It was not designed for dealing with the content of a Web page. Additional features have been added to HTML, but they do not solve data description or cataloging issues in an HTML document. Because HTML is not extensible, it cannot be modified to meet specific needs. Browser developers have added features making HTML more robust, but this has resulted in a confusing mix of different HTML standards.
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 5 XP THE LIMITS OF HTML HTML cannot be applied consistently. Different browsers require different standards making the final document appear differently on one browser compared with another.
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 6 XP THE 10 PRIMARY XML DESIGN GOALS 1. XML must be easily usable over the Internet 2. XML must support a wide variety of applications 3. XML must be compatible with SGML 4. It must be easy to write programs that process XML documents 5. The number of optional features in XML must be kept to a minimum, ideally zero
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 7 XP THE 10 PRIMARY XML DESIGN GOALS — CONTINUED 1. XML documents should be clear and easily understood by nonprogrammers 2. The XML design should be prepared quickly 3. The design of XML must be exact and concise 4. XML documents must be easy to create 5. Terseness in XML markup is of minimum importance
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New Perspectives on XML, 2nd Edition Tutorial 1 8 XP XML VOCABULARIES
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Tutorial 1 9 XP WELL-FORMED AND VALID XML DOCUMENTS An XML document is well-formed if it contains no syntax errors and fulfills all of the specifications for XML code as defined by the W3C. An XML document is valid if it is well-formed
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2010 for the course CS CS178 taught by Professor Mandyam during the Spring '10 term at Ohlone.

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Tutorial.01 - TUTORIAL 1 XP CREATING AN XML DOCUMENT New...

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