Comparative Religion and Magic Lecture Notes

Comparative Religion and Magic Lecture Notes - Comparative...

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Comparative Religion and Magic Lecture Notes Some modes of religion (not an exhaustive list) Animatism – Cross cultural. Refers to beliefs in abstract, impersonal forces. Usually not a directly religious concept. Includes ideas like luck, karma, charisma, fate, or grace Example: Some Polynesian cultures have concept of “mana,” a temporary positive force inhabiting people or objects Animism – Refers to belief in souls or spirits. This can mean ghosts of the dead, nature spirits, spirits of intangible concepts, etc. Frequently attached to veneration of the dead or ancestral spirits. Example: Shintoism in Japan. This is essentially the ancestral Japanese religion, which venerates nature and involves ancestor worship. Shrines to both of those are found throughout Japan. Polytheism – Belief in multiple gods or divine forces. Can overlap considerable with animism, but usually distinct in that divinities involved usually represent more general and more powerful forces. Example: Classical Greek religion, with its pantheon of gods Monotheism – Belief in a single, usually personal God. Examples: Judaism, Christianity, Islam Pantheism – Literally “God is everything.” All powerful, all encompassing immanent force inhabiting everything. Usually refers to an impersonal underlying force. Example: The concept of Brahman in the Hindu (Vedic religions)
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2010 for the course ANTHRO 101 taught by Professor Osbjorn during the Fall '09 term at New Mexico.

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Comparative Religion and Magic Lecture Notes - Comparative...

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