SP1 - Macromolecules Found In Everyday Milk UNM Bio 124L 23 February 2010 Introduction The foods that we eat everyday have nutritional value that

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Macromolecules Found In Everyday Milk UNM Bio 124L 23 February 2010 Introduction
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The foods that we eat everyday have nutritional value that our body needs in order to function to its fullest capacity. Four macromolecules that are found in our diet are: carbohydrates, starches, lipids and proteins. These macromolecules can be found in an array of different foods, whether they are naturally or artificially synthesized. Carbohydrates are composed of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen and can be classified into two categories: monosaccharides (simple sugars) and polysaccharides (two or more monosaccharides). They are also the preferred macromolecule for obtaining energy (ATP) by cells within the body; minimal energy is required for the breakdown of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate monosaccharides are found in foods, in the form of glucose and fructose. A polysaccharide consists of two or more monosaccharides and an example would be a starch. Starch is found in plants, acting as an energy storage facilitator (Campbell, et al., 2008). Lipids have numerous functions, one of which is the most efficient use of lipids in the form of energy storage: triglycerides. Triglycerides are composed of a glycerol backbone and three fatty acid chains, and an ester bond. Lipids are hydrophobic, meaning that they are not able to break down in water, which can have its advantage in the human body, which can hold large amounts of water. When the body does not have carbohydrates to use for energy, its next best choice is lipids. Because lipids are hydrophobic it requires a lot more work to break them down (Campbell, et al., 2008). Finally, the last macromolecule to be mentioned is protein. They are the most complicated compounds found in nature. Proteins are composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen just like everything else, but it also contains another key element: nitrogen. Proteins are long chains of amino acids. They are also polar, meaning they are soluble in water, but not all proteins dissolve. So when we consume foods that contain proteins, they are broken down to their smallest form: amino acids. The body then uses the amino acids in order to build proteins. They help compose enzymes, blood cells, and muscle tissues (Couch and Berger, 2004). There are four tests that can be done on any given food to test whether they are carbohydrates, starches, lipids or proteins; those tests are Benedict’s test, Starch test, Sudan IV test and the Biuret test. Benedict’s test is used for the detection of sugars; if there proves to be sugars the solution will become “cloudy” and have a yellow-orange color. The starch test uses iodine, which inserts itself within monosaccharide chains of starch molecules, which causes a deep blue-black color. The Sudan IV test is a dye that is soluble in lipids but not in water. The dye stains the fatty acid molecule red-orange. The Biuret test is used for the detection of proteins. Each tested material is then given 1mL of Biuret reagent, which is then shaken and if
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/24/2010 for the course BIOL 124 taught by Professor Caral./giaccardo during the Spring '10 term at New Mexico.

Page1 / 9

SP1 - Macromolecules Found In Everyday Milk UNM Bio 124L 23 February 2010 Introduction The foods that we eat everyday have nutritional value that

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online