Intro to the Structural Perspective

Intro to the Structural Perspective - Structural Views of...

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Structural Views of Poverty & Inequality
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Freeman on the relationship btw The Problem: Starting in the 1970’s the normal relationship btw economic growth and poverty reduction broke down Let us recall that the conventional wisdom since the depression had been that economic growth would gradually diminish the poverty rate (i.e. the % of population living under the poverty threshold. NOTE: this was considered to be particularly safe assumption due to the relatively ABSOLUTE measure of poverty that the U.S. employs.
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Some Vocabulary to keep in mind Wages = $ / Hour / Worker Earnings = $ / week (or month) / Worker Note that earnings can go up when wages don’t (by worker working more hours in a week). Family Income = $ / week (or month) / Family. Note that total family income can go up when wages don’t because a) single worker can work more hours or B) more people in family – usually a spouse – enters the labor market and increases total family earning hours . Also remember: Median Income vs. Mean Income; Gross Domestic Product ( GDP ); “ Real ” income (i.e. adjusted for inflation) and “ Real ” growth in GDP (also adjusted for inflation).
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Why Poverty Rates Were Assumed to Fall (with normal economic growth
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Intro to the Structural Perspective - Structural Views of...

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