310alzheimers10toprint

310alzheimers10toprint - 1 Outline for today Definition of...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Outline for today Definition of dementia Alzheimers characteristics Alzheimers biochemistry Current treatments Stumbling blocks/future opportunities Dementia Progressive deterioration of memory and cognitive function. Not a single disease.-Reversible dementia: theoretically can treat underlying cause and reverse dementia (e.g. vitamin B12 deficiency, tumor , etc.)-Irreversible dementia: caused by an incurable condition (Alzheimers, strokes, etc.) Dementia Prevalence: 1 in 20 people over the age of 65 (prior to 65 is called pre-senile or early-onset) 1 in 5 over the age of 80 By 2050, it is predicted over 100 million people worldwide will suffer from dementia. Estimated financial cost of dementia in 2005: >315 billion $$$ Great social and psychological costs as well- gradual yet continuous disease progression 2 Alzheimer s Disease (AD)- most common type of dementia German neurologist Alois Alzheimer 1906 case study: 51-yr. old woman (Frau Auguste D.), demented, postmortem analysis found interesting neuropathological features AD Neuropathology Gross findings: Cortical atrophy Histological features: plaques and tangles Amyloid Plaques Contain primarily beta-amyloid (also known as A ) Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) Contain primarily abnormal tau Not unique to AD: observed in brains non-demented and Parkinsons patients AD Neuropathology Gross findings: Cortical atrophy Histological features: plaques and tangles Amyloid Plaques Contain primarily beta-amyloid (also known as A ) Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) Contain primarily abnormal tau Not unique to AD: observed in brains non-demented and Parkinsons patients 3 AD Neuropathology Cortical atrophy (caused by cell death and loss of neurons) AD AD Neuropathology Gross findings: Cortical atrophy Histological features: plaques and tangles Amyloid Plaques Contain primarily beta-amyloid (also known as A ) Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) Contain primarily abnormal tau Not unique to AD: observed in brains non-demented and Parkinsons patients AD Neuropathology Histological features: plaques and tangles Amyloid Plaque Normal Neuron Neurofibrillary Tangle (NFT) 4 Diagnosis of AD Difficult: dementia not specific to AD Generally not possible to have a definitive diagnosis until autopsy Assessment of patient Normal aging versus dementia Exclude other, potentially treatable dementias Estimated accuracy is 90% http://www.alz.org/national/documents/brochure_basicsofalz_low.pdfhttp://www....
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310alzheimers10toprint - 1 Outline for today Definition of...

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