chromatography lab

Chromatography lab - Rachel Romm Bio I H Chromatography separation of Leaf Pigments 15 December 2008 Problem What is the pattern formed by the

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Rachel Romm Bio I H Chromatography separation of Leaf Pigments 15 December 2008
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Problem: What is the pattern formed by the pigments on the chromatography paper? Objective: Using the process of ascending paper chromatography, students will separate and identify the pigments found in spinach leaves. Hypothesis: If there is a pattern formed by the pigments in the chromatography paper, Chlorophyll B will travel the least because it is the heaviest one and Carotene will travel the most because it is the lightest. Introduction: Chromatography is the method of separating and identifying colored mixtures, such as pigment found in spinach leafs. Chromatography works by having pigment stained on the chromatography paper and having the paper placed into a non-polar solvent, such as petroleum ether and acetone. The chromatography paper absorbed the solvent that takes the pigment stain with it and sorts it out, heaviest on the bottom lightest on the top, as it travels up the chromatography paper. Chromatography is used for separating mixed components. Chlorophyll A is the primary pigment found in most plants and algae. In order to grow, plants and algae use chlorophyll A to trap the sun’s energy . Chlorophyll B is very similar to chlorophyll A except that it is lacking oxygen and has two extra hydrogen atoms. Chlorophyll B also has a slightly different absorbance maximum with about 453nm and 642nm, Chlorophyll A has an absorbance maximum of about 430nm and 662nm. Carotene is an orange pigment that is responsible for the coloring of carrots, pumpkins, and sweet potatoes. Carotene is insoluble in water but is soluble in a lipid. Carotene can also be converted into vitamin A. carotene is not very constitutive to photosynthesis but is does transmit all of its captured energy to the chlorophylls. Xanthophyll is a yellow pigment that is found in the leaves of most plants along with chlorophyll. Xanthophyll is an oxidized derivative of carotene. Both xanthophyll and carotene are accessory pigments and are only seen naturally when chlorophyll is denatured in the autumn. Pigments are important to photosynthesis because light energy bounces from pigment molecule to pigment molecule, which capture the energy that it gives of. Reference front
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This note was uploaded on 03/25/2010 for the course BIO 5381 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at N. Arizona.

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Chromatography lab - Rachel Romm Bio I H Chromatography separation of Leaf Pigments 15 December 2008 Problem What is the pattern formed by the

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