Henslin_wk2 - powerless by a ruling elite ageism with a...

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powerless by a ruling elite; ageism, with a struggle for finances (Social Secu- rity) and health care (Medicare) dividing the generations of workers; and so on, Due to space limitations, I can provide only this brief sketch of these three theories that dominate sociology today. Among the many examples of symbolic interactionism in this book, you might look at selections by Clark (11), Goffman (12), Lawson (18), and Henslin and Biggs (20). The readings by Gans (33) and Harris (40) provide examples of functionalism, while the one by Gracey' (39) is an example of conflict theory. The dominant orienta- tion of this book is symbolic interactionism. Part II of the book, then, builds upon Part I. I hope that it will help you to better appreciate how sociologists do their research and how they inter- pret what they find. .. 4 How Sociologists Do Research JAMES M. HENSLIN Guesswork does not go very far in helping us to understand our social world. Some of our guesses, hunches, and ideas that pass for com- mon sense are correct. Others are not. And we seldom know which is which. Sociologists must gather data in such a way that what they report is objective-presenting information that represents what is really "out there." To do so, they must use methods that other researchers can repeat (replicate) to check their findings. They also must tie their findings into what other researchers have already reported and into sociological theory. In this overview of research methods, Henslin outlines the procedures that sociologists use to gather data. Renee had never felt fear before-at least not like this. It had begun as a vague feeling that something was out of place. Then she felt it creep up her spine, slowly tightening as it clawed its way upward. Now it was like a fist pounding inside her skull. . Renee never went anywhere with strangers. Hadn't her parents hammered that into her head since she was a child? And now, at 19, she wasn't about to start breaking that rule. And yet here she was, in a car with a stranger. He seemed nice enough. And it wasn't as though he were some strange guy on the side of the road or anything. She had met George at Pa- tricia's party, and everyone seemed to know him, Renee had first been attracted by his dark eyes. They seemed to light up his entire face when he smiled. And when he asked her to dance, Renee felt flattered. He was a little older, a little more sure of himself than most of the guys she knew. Renee liked that: It was a sign of maturity. As the evening wore on and he continued to be attentive to her, it seemed natural to accept his offer to take her home. But then they passed the turn to her dorm. She didn't un- derstand his mumbled reply about "getting something." And as he turned off on the country road, that clawing at the back of her neck had begun. As he looked at her, his eyes almost pierced the darkness,
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Henslin_wk2 - powerless by a ruling elite ageism with a...

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