Deontological normative ethical theories place focus of right and wrong in autonomous adherence _0

Deontological normative ethical theories place focus of right and wrong in autonomous adherence _0

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Deontological vs. Teleological Ethical Systems 1 Deontological vs. Teleological Ethical Systems How They Work Selina Appel ADJ/135 Yolanda White Johnson October 16, 2009
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Deontological vs. Teleological Ethical Systems 2 Deontological normative ethical theories place focus of right and wrong in autonomous adherence to moral laws or duties. In order to make correct moral choices, we need to understand what are moral duties are and what the correct rules exist for those duties to be regulated. When people follow their duty, they are behaving morally. When people fail to follow their duties they are behaving immorally. An example of deontology would be if a person was a student at a school shooting and refused to shoot one of the African Americans, it might be because they felt they had a duty to follow the commandments, “thou shalt not kill.” This sentence then becomes a rule that one attempts to live by. If a person is a deontologist they tend to not look at how much good that might be caused by an action, but they look at the action itself. Deciding whether it is prohibited or made obligatory by one of their rules. Most of the time the rules are expressed negatively, do not lie, do not harm the innocent, do not steal. In some cases, rules are expressed positively, keep promises, treat all people as beings with rights, and tell the truth. According to Joyce Pollock, deontological ethical systems pertain to behaviors that are evaluated by others. Under the realm of the deontological ethical systems fall the categories of ethical formalism, religion, and natural law (Pollock, 2004). Ethical formalism is concerned with the motivation behind one’s actions; the statement can characterize it: “ What is good is that which conforms to the categorical imperative” (Pollock, 2004 p.49). For example, if a man performs CPR on a choking woman and in the process breaks her sternum, which then leads to her death, then ethical formalism would say that this man’s actions were inherently good because of his intent. Ethical formalism does not approve of “eye for an eye” type justification; therefore, issuing the death sentence for a murderer would still be judged as bad. In ethical formalism, there is no justification for murder because no good can come from taking a life intentionally, no matter what the circumstances are (Pollock, 2004).
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Deontological vs. Teleological Ethical Systems
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2010 for the course ADJ235 ADJ235 taught by Professor Axia during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Deontological normative ethical theories place focus of right and wrong in autonomous adherence _0

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