Global Warming - Global Warming 1 Global Warming:...

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Global Warming 1 Global Warming: Mitigation Strategies and Solutions By: Selina Appel Sci/275 Gregory Canard October 02, 2009
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Global Warming 2 The world and the atmosphere took billions of years to develop, yet advances in technology have given today’s society the power to change the atmosphere in fewer than a hundred years. When the Industrial Revolution began in the eighteenth to early nineteenth century inventors began making energy – saving machines, these machines used fossil fuels a form of energy, which makes large amounts of carbon. Carbon is an element that is a part of earth, which comes from the organic remains of plants and animals; that have died and been buried millions of years ago. Most of the carbon present in the world’s atmosphere comes from nuclear fusion, gases from stars. Gases from these fusions in the atmosphere can affect our climate and contribute to global warming, with time heat and pressure has changed these fossil fuels into coal, oil, and natural gases. Huge amounts of these fuels like carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and other gases are released into our atmosphere every day; the results are dangerous and serious to humans. Global Warming, in which my paper will discuss, is the most significant environmental problem we face today. Carbon Dioxide and water vapor are like the glass in a greenhouse. A greenhouse is the heating of the surface of a planet or moon, due to the pressure of an atmosphere containing gasses that absorb and emit infrared radiation. Greenhouses trap the heat from the sun isolating warm air inside the structure so that the heat is not lost by convection. (Wikipedia – Greenhouse effect) This allows isolation to reach the Earth’s surface; the greenhouse cuts the escape of energy down. This is known as the greenhouse effect. If we did not have this, then energy from Earth would escape making it too cold for anything to live. Many scientist fears, by burning fossil fuels it adds carbon dioxide to our atmosphere, which by trapping more heat than the natural
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Global Warming 3 warming could upset the balance of Earth. At an alarming rate, forests are being cut down, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are being absorb by these trees and plants. Climates that are studied by different scientists (Climatologists) are analyzing and recording data for global warming purposes and issues. They are taking measurements and temperatures around the world; they want to know if humans and their activities are causing the Earth to become warmer. Some side effects and or potential problems need to be addressed; areas that are warm may become warmer if global temperatures rise. With little to no rainfall in the deserts, this may change the way farmers in other or different regions farm; the ability to grow or produce food could decrease. Take for instance the Antarctic ice sheet; this is a land mass that contains ninety percent of the world’s ice and eighty percent of the world’s fresh water. Global warming could cause the Antarctic ice sheet to melt; if this
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2010 for the course SCI 275 SCI 275 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Global Warming - Global Warming 1 Global Warming:...

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