solutions chapter 2

solutions chapter 2 - CHAPTER TWO 16. The halogens have a...

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CHAPTER TWO 16. The halogens have a high affinity for electrons, and one important way they react is to form anions of the type X ! . The alkali metals tend to give up electrons easily and in most of their compounds exist as M + cations. Note: These two very reactive groups are only one electron away (in the periodic table) from the least reactive family of elements, the noble gases. 22. a. A molecule has no overall charge (an equal number of electrons and protons are present). Ions, on the other and, have extra electrons added or removed to form anions (negatively charged ions) or cations (positively charged ions). b. The sharing of electrons between atoms is a covalent bond. An ionic bond is the force of attraction between two oppositely charged ions. c. A molelcule is a collection of atoms held together by covalent bonds. A compound is composed of two or more different elements having constant composition. Covalent and/or ionic bonds can hold the atoms together in a compound. Another difference is that molecules do not necessarily have to be compounds. H 2 is two hydrogen atoms held together by a covalent bond. H 2 is a molecule, but it is not a compound; H
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This note was uploaded on 03/26/2010 for the course CHEM 105ALg taught by Professor Bau during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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solutions chapter 2 - CHAPTER TWO 16. The halogens have a...

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