Lecture 1

Lecture 1 - Water = hydroxide and hydrogen Specifically,...

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3 problems in bio: Containment problem – cell walls Specificity problem – cell type Information problem – DNA Uptake, conversion, production: cells 92 elements, 25 essential Proton, neutron, electron Atomic number = protons 12 C 6 = mass – number = neutrons Protons = electrons HCNOPS (1 4 5 6 3 6 [valence]) Covalent bonds: Electrons are shared Stable and strong – 50 to 200 kcal/mole Atoms very close (~0.1 to 0.2 nm apart) Usually represented by –, : (usually a line) Polar/nonpolar Nonpolar Nonpolar Polar Nonpolar Electronegativity of an atom dictates equal or unequal sharing of electron pairs Molecules that cant form hydrogen bonds are necessarily nonpolar and hydrophobic; ie just fatties with ability to make connections in water. Ionic – set up in ratios as opposed to matching up like covalently bonded molecules
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Unformatted text preview: Water = hydroxide and hydrogen Specifically, the covalent arrangement of atoms in a biological molecule determine the non-covalent function of other stuff. Hydroxyl Carbonyl Carboxyl Amino Sulfhydryl Phosphate Methyl Amine: NH3+ Carboxyl COO- + H+ At physiological ph=~7 Negative groups: phosphate, Sulfhydryl Especially at set ph, the function groups we well study behave with autonomy. Their chem. Properties occur independently of exactly who they are bound to Solve the containment problem: Amphipathic molecules: hydrophobic and hydrophilic micelle Solution to containment problem: phospholipids aka phospholipid bilayer...
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Lecture 1 - Water = hydroxide and hydrogen Specifically,...

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