HP 442 Presentation

HP 442 Presentation - The Association Between Intracranial...

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The Association Between Intracranial Neoplasms and Ionizing Radiation Harry Mai Health Promotion Disease Prevention – 442 November 24 th , 2008
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What Are Intracranial Neoplasms? Neoplasm – abnormal proliferation of cells Greek: New Growth Include the cerebral hemisphere, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem and cerebellum. Focus on cerebral hemisphere
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Types of Intracranial Neoplasms Primary – originate in the CNS and rarely spread beyond it (50% of all brain tumors) Gliomas (44.4%) Meningioma (27.4%) Secondary (metastatic) – migrated cancer cells (20 – 30% of all malignant cancers)
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Glioma Emerges from glial cells of spine and brain Prognosis is usually poor Result in most years of life lost among tumors Risk Factors: IgE, Radiation, Genetic Disposition, Head Trauma
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Gliomas By Grade Low-grade: well differentiated (not anaplastic); benign with better prognosis High-grade: undifferentiated or anaplastic; malignant
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Notable Case United States Senator Ted Kennedy (Democrat – Massachusetts) High grade (malignant) glioma
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Glioma: By the Numbers Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States Incidence: 14.8 per 100,000 people Attributable Deaths: 12,760 annually Survival Rate < 45: 62.5% > 45: 10.5%
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