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0219 Notes - As you arrive today please take some time to...

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2/19/10 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 20 1 As you arrive today, please take some time to fi ll out an evaluation. Blank forms and pencils are available on the front tables. If you borrow a pencil, please be sure to return it. Give your completed form to the student volunteer. Thank you. PH 202 (Winter term, 2010) Instructor : Chris Cof fi n L ecture section : 001 = 8:00 a.m. 002 = 9:00 a.m.
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2/19/10 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 20 2 Phase Equilibrium When a substance changes phase due to heat gain (or loss), not all of its molecules change phase simultaneously. The fi rst Joules of heat to arrive (or leave) let some of the molecules escape (or re-bond); others have to wait their turn until more thermal (kinetic) energy arrives (or leaves). But the transitions don’t proceed in just one direction . As water boils, for example, most phase-changing particles are transitioning from liquid to gas. But some particles are going the other way—condensing—instead. Why? Keep in mind that temperature is a statistical quantity—an indication of average particle kinetic energy. At any one time, a given particle may have more or less than the kinetic energy required to maintain its presence in a particular phase.
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2/19/10 Oregon State University PH 202, Lecture 20 3
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