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Ch05 - Securing the Network Infrastructure

Ch05 - Securing the Network Infrastructure - Securing the...

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Securing the Network I nfrastructure Security+ Guideto Network Security Fundamentals Second Edition Chapter 5:
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2 Objectives Work with thenetwork cable plant Secureremovable media Harden network devices Design network topologies
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3 Working with the Network Cable Plant Cableplant: physical infrastructure of a network (wire, connectors, and cables) used to carry data communication signals between equipment Threetypes of transmission media: Coaxial cables Twisted-pair cables Fiber-optic cables
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4 Coaxial Cables Coaxial cablewas main typeof copper cabling used in computer networks for many years Has a single copper wireat its center surrounded by insulation and shielding Called “coaxial” becauseit houses two (co) axes or shafts the copper wireand theshielding Thick coaxial cablehas a copper wirein center surrounded by a thick layer of insulation that is covered with braided metal shielding
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5 Coaxial Cables (continued) Thin coaxial cablelooks similar to thecable that carries a cable TV signal A braided copper mesh channel surrounds the insulation and everything is covered by an outer shield of insulation for the cable itself The copper mesh channel protects thecorefrom interference BNC connectors: connectors used on the ends of a thin coaxial cable
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6 Coaxial Cables (continued)
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7 Twisted-Pair Cables Standard for copper cabling used in computer networks today, replacing thin coaxial cable Composed of two insulated copper wires twisted around each other and bundled together with other pairs in a jacket Shielded twisted-pair (STP) cables havea foil shielding on the insideof the jacket to reduce interference Unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables do not have any shielding Twisted-pair cables have RJ-45 connectors
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8 Fiber-Optic Cables Coaxial and twisted-pair cables havecopper wire at the center that conducts an electrical signal Fiber-optic cable uses a very thin cylinder of glass (core) at its center instead of copper that transmit light impulses A glass tube (cladding) surrounds the core The core and cladding are protected by a jacket
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9 Fiber-Optic Cables (continued) Classified by thediameter of thecoreand thediameter of the cladding Diameters are measured in microns, each is about 1/25,000 of an inch or one-millionth of a meter Two types: Single-modefiber cables: used when data must be transmitted over long distances Multimodecable: supports many simultaneous light transmissions, generated by light-emitting diodes
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10 Securing the Cable Plant Securing cabling outside the protected network is not the primary security issuefor most organizations Focus is on protecting access to thecable plant in theinternal network An attacker who can access the internal network directly through the cableplant has effectively bypassed thenetwork security perimeter and can launch his attacks at will
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11 Securing the Cable Plant (continued)
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