Test 2 - 12:22:00 Test2 February27,2009 Congress 1 2...

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23/03/2009 12:22:00 Test 2 February 27, 2009 Congress 1. Politics is a part of everything that occurs in politics.  2. The majority party in control of either the House of the Senate wields  enormous power and sets the agenda for the legislatures. This is  especially true in the House. The Speaker of the House has enormous  power to enforce power and roll over the minorities. Right now, the  Democrats are in charge. The Senate is different. Filibusters—minority  parties can talk a bill to death. This forces the hand of the majority party to  compromise. Now, the filibuster can just be threatened. Filibusters take up  time and waste time.  This power is set in the rules and procedures. It has  been adopted over time to manage the legislature.  3. It is exceedingly easy to kill bills in the congress. There are many points in  the legislature in which a bill can be killed. It is very difficult for a bill to  become a law if congress does not agree to it.  To understand congress and congressman, you  need to understand 3 things: 1. What matters more than anything else is the reelection of that  congressman—especially true in the House where they run every 2 years.  2. After reelection is secured, the next highest priority is institutional power  and prestige. <Party chairman, party leader> There are two reasons for this: 1. People in politics are aggressive and want to be successful at all  costs. They will always pursue more power. 2. If you are the chairman or leader, you reelection chances are  enhanced. Being on a powerful committee gives you the  opportunity to trade things that can help and enhance your district  or state. 3. Most members do want to promote good public policy.  Most start out as school board members, etc. They want to get  these thing passed. Most hate campaigning and would rather be  pursuing policy issues. But, if they want to be reelected, they  have to do. It is also why every House member wants to be a  Senate—the Senate gets reelected every 6 years. 
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How was congress formed? The Great Compromise—VA plan. Bicameral congress. The House is based  on population; the Senate has equal representation—2 per state.  The framers planned the Senate to be the much more considered body. Their  6 year terms were designed to insulate the Senators from the back and forth  sway of politics. More long term view of policy and direction. They enhanced  this idea by staggered terms. Only 1/3 is reelected every 2 years. The entire  House is elected every 2 years. Qualifications of the Senate are higher—must 
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