Biomes Tundra

Biomes Tundra - Snowy owl -- a carnivore that preys on...

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Biomes I Introduction and Tundra D.R. Hileman
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Map of Biomes of North America
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The combination of precipitation and temperature determines which biome is present in an area.
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As you proceed from the North pole to the equator, you will pass through the same series of biomes that you would pass through if you climbed a tall mountain. Equator North Pole Low Elevation High Eleva- tion
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Tundra: Arctic
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Distribution of tundra in North America.
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Distribution of Tundra in World
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General View of Arctic Tundra
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General View of Arctic Tundra
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General View of Arctic Tundra
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General View of Arctic Tundra
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Close-up of plants. Arctic plants are short (no trees) so as to remain under the snow for protection in the winter.
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Female Musk Ox (Males have much thicker, heavier horns. When the herd is threatened, the males form a circle around the females and young, with their heavy horns protruding outwards.)
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Caribou
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Lemming -- an herbivorous rodent
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Unformatted text preview: Snowy owl -- a carnivore that preys on lemmings Many arctic animals change colors with the seasons, from white in the winter to brown in the summer, so as to blend in with their surroundings all year long. Arctic Fox Summer Winter Tundra: Alpine General View of Alpine Tundra General View of Alpine Tundra Alpine Tundra Wildflowers Forget-me-not, a popular alpine wildflower Snow buttercup flowering through melting snow Rocky windswept area of tundra with cushion plants Close-up of cushion plant. Note the tiny leaves. Marmot Tundra: Tropical Alpine General view of tropical alpine tundra. Note the clump growth form which helps insulate the plants against the freezing nighttime temperatures. General view of tropical alpine tundra. Leaves on some plants are modified for insulation, to protect the plant from freezing at night. Continued in Part II...
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2010 for the course BIOL Biology taught by Professor Dr.hileman during the Spring '10 term at Tuskegee.

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Biomes Tundra - Snowy owl -- a carnivore that preys on...

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