Correlational Research 3

Correlational Research 3 - Correlational Research When...

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Correlational Research When scientists want to understand the relationship between two or more variables (behaviors, traits, events), they use correlational studies. A correlation explains the degree to which two variables are co-related or covary with one another. Specifically correlations tell us whether the value of one variable that we have measured changes systematically with the value of a second variable that we have measured. The strength and direction of the relationship is represented by a correlation coefficient ( r ). The value of a correlation coefficient may range from -1.00 to +1.00 and represents the strength of the relationship. If we consider the absolute value of r and ignore the sign, a correlation coefficient equal to 1.00 (either +1.00 or -1.00) represents a “perfect correlation” between the variables. When a perfect correlation is found, the pairs of scores from each participant will fall exactly on the “line of best fit” if we plot those points on a scatterplot (see below). Perfect relationships are very rare, but the
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2010 for the course PSYC 2003 taught by Professor Swanner during the Spring '07 term at Arkansas.

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Correlational Research 3 - Correlational Research When...

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