Final - Lign 120 - Spring 2009 Ackerman Final Exam Exams...

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Lign 120 - Spring 2009 – Ackerman Final Exam Exams are due by Please collect all of your answers to each problem set on a separate sheet of paper, since this will facilitate grading. Though interaction was encouraged for the homeworks, you should not be consulting with other class members about any aspect of the final. Cheating from any source will require disciplinary action. Exams should be turned in to my office: 4101 APM. I will be in my office
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Question 1: Part 1 Note: Since this is large data set, it will be crucial to organize your observations and hypotheses as suggested below. This is a challenging problem, but it should be fun: our grading will, naturally, take into the complexity of the problem. If you notice any inexplicable inconsistencies, please notify me: though I have obviously gone over the data carefully, if some data bit seems to violate an otherwise clear generalization, it may be a copying error on my part. 1. In this data there are allomorphs for certain morphosyntactic categories, among them the infinitival marker. There are 3 infinitival allomorphs. In order to identify them you will have to make assumptions about the structure of (classes of) verb stems: pay close attention to the interaction between morphology and phonology. Please identify the allomorphs (list them) and categorize the verbs into different classes on the basis of this. Collect all of the verbs in each class into a list containing all of the members of the hypothesized class: this will facilitate further analysis. For each allomorph specify whether it is determined by phonological or morphological conditions (or both) 2. Identify all other instances of allomorphy for other morphosyntactic categories. For each allomorph specify whether it is determined by phonological or morphological conditions (or both). State the specific conditions: this can be in prose or your favorite rule format. It is, of course, one thing to simply state conditions and quite another for those conditions to function explanatorily. For example, for some fictitious language I can state that a final segment p turns into a segment k when it precedes the segment m : while this may be sufficient to account for how a word such as mip becomes mikm , the unnaturalness of this change suggests that this is a good description of the arbitrary distributions, i.e., but does not explain why the change occurs in that environment. Given this, consider whether the conditions you identify for the various types of allomorphy seem to follow, i.e., be explainable, from properties of the environment in which they occur. If they do, then state these properties in your description of the allomorphy.
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Consider the following verb forms: It is important to consult your IPA
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Final - Lign 120 - Spring 2009 Ackerman Final Exam Exams...

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