farmer revolt - From 1877 to 1897 American politics rested...

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From 1877 to 1897 American politics rested on a delicate balance of power that left neither Republicans nor Democrats in control. Party loyalty rarely wavered. In every election, 16 states could be counted on to vote Republican and 14 Democratic. In only six states—the most important being New York and Ohio—were the results in doubt. An average of nearly 80 percent of eligible voters turned out for presidential elections between 1860 and 1900, a figure higher than at any time since. In that era, however, the electorate made up a smaller percentage of the population. About one American in five actually voted in presidential elections from 1876 to 1892. Third political parties might also crystallize around a single concern or a particular group. Those who sought inflation of the currency formed the Greenback party (1874). Angry farmers in the West and South created the Populist, or People’s, party (1892). All drew supporters from both conventional parties, but as single-interest groups they mobilized minorities, not
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2010 for the course HIS125 9021314933 taught by Professor Doreenpauley during the Fall '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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farmer revolt - From 1877 to 1897 American politics rested...

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