Problem Set 2

Problem Set 2 - Name Section Rec TA Side 1 of 3 Ch 1a...

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Name Ch 1a, Problem Set Two Section Side 1 of 3 Due Friday, Oct. 8, 2005 Rec TA at 4 PM in the Drop Box Problems 1, 3 and 7 are designated ( ) as “ no collaboration ” problems. From this point on, each set will have a select number of problems designated as such. For these problems you must complete them yourself! You may not work with others, consult upperclassman, or compare final answers. Failure to abide by this policy will be considered a violation of the honor code! As with Problem Set One, be sure to watch the significant figures and answer problems in the units specified! Please report uncertainties to one significant figure only. 1. (15 Points, 5 Each) Electromagnetic (EM) radiation figures heavily not only into what we see, but also in what we hear. a. An excited sodium atom emits light as it undergoes a transition from one energy level to another that is 3.61 " 10 # 19 J lower in energy. Determine the wavelength, in nm, and the color of the light you would expect upon heating a compound like NaCl in a flame. b. The coating on the walls of a high-pressure mercury vapor light tube primarily converts 365.0 nm ultraviolet light to 600.5 nm visible light (among other frequencies that we will conveniently ignore), by absorbing and then emitting again. However, the principle of conservation of energy means something has to be done with the remainder of the energy it absorbed from the UV photon. How many eV’s (electron volts) of energy are left over (as heat) after one absorption and emission event? c. “89.3 KPCC” (the FCC approved call signal out of Pasadena/Los Angeles carrying NPR and other public broadcasting) broadcasts at 89.3 MHz as its name suggests. What is the wavelength of this radio signal? What is its energy?
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