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Subject 1 Intro and Examples on nano-micro scale

Subject 1 Intro and Examples on nano-micro scale - 510.422...

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510.422 Micro- and Nano Structured Materials and Devices Spring 2010 Department of Materials Science and Engineering Dr. Evan Ma 6-8601 MD 105 [email protected]
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Course Objective: Address key materials science issues when systems are small (especially when nano), with examples in the areas of processing, structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, stability and properties/performance. Discuss how to make and characterize nanostructured materials. Examine how properties change on the nanoscale with regards to electronic, optical, magnetic, mechanical, chemical and biological behavior. Survey representative/typical micro- and nano- structured materials and devices, including major developments in recent years. Provide the opportunity for each student to conduct a case study to research a specific micro- or nano- material/device/process of personal interest, analyzing the new science, engineering challenges and property/application advantages when the system has nanoscale features.
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Subject 1 Introduction
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The scale of things: 1 nanometer (1 nm=10-9 m) is approx the width of 10 hydrogen atoms, 4 metal atoms or 1 sugar molecule. 1 nm = 1/1000 width of typical bacteria 1 nm = millionth the size of a pinhead 0
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Length scales in science and in life 10 -18 m 10 -16 10 -14 10 -12 10 -10 10 -8 10 -6 10 -4 10 -2 10 0 10 +2 10 +4 10 6 Biology Materials electron nucleus Planet atomic radius Carbon nanotube NanoLab AFM probe tip Pacific Nanotechnology Grain in crystalline metal Belak et al, LLNL Spall voids M1A1 Abrams Airbus A380 Schrodinger DNA virus bacteria cell beetle student Blue whale
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Powers of 10 pictures taken from http://www.powerof10.com/powers/poster.php 0
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0 Powers of 10 pictures
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In 1959, Richard Feynman delivers lecture to the American Physical Society, “There is plenty of room at the bottom”. Describes nanotechnology as an important field for future 1. Can we write small and build very small structures and machines?
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