annurev.anthro.34.081804 - Indigenous Movements in Latin...

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Unformatted text preview: Indigenous Movements in Latin America, 19922004: Controversies, Ironies, New Directions Jean E. Jackson 1 and Kay B. Warren 2 1 Anthropology Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; email: jjackson@mit.edu 2 Watson Institute of International Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1970; email: Kay Warren@brown.edu Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 2005. 34:54973 The Annual Review of Anthropology is online at anthro.annualreviews.org doi: 10.1146/ annurev.anthro.34.081804.120529 Copyright c 2005 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 0084-6570/05/1021- 0549$20.00 Key Words new social movements, cultural rights, indigenous politics, public intellectuals, diversity versus essentialism Abstract This review examines literature on indigenous movements in Latin America from 1992 to 2004. It addresses ethnic identity and eth- nic activism, in particular the reindianization processes occurring in indigenous communities throughout the region. We explore the im- pact that states and indigenous mobilizing efforts have had on each other, as well as the role of transnational nongovernmental organi- zations and para-statal organizations, neoliberalism more broadly, and armed conict. Shifts in ethnoracial, political, and cultural in- digenous discourses are examined, special attention being paid to new deployments of rhetorics concerned with political imaginaries, customary law, culture, and identity. Self-representational strategies will be numerous and dynamic, identities themselves multiple, uid, and abundantly positional. The challenges these dynamics present for anthropological field research and ethnographic writing are dis- cussed, as is the dialogue between scholars, indigenous and not, and activists,indigenousandnot.Conclusionssuggestpotentiallyfruitful research directions for the future. 549 A n n u . R e v . A n t h r o p o l . 2 5 . 3 4 : 5 4 9- 5 7 3 . D o w n l o a d e d f r o m a r j o u r n a l s . a n n u a l r e v i e w s . o r g b y E M O R Y U N I V E R S I T Y o n 3 / 1 8 / 1 . F o r p e r s o n a l u s e o n l y . Customary law: gives local authorities rights to judge, detain, settle disputes, establish sanctions, and punish on the basis of their distinctive normative systems (Latin American) indigenous peoples: culturally diverse political minorities who trace their histories and cultural identifications before the conquest and colonization of the New World Contents INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 DISCOURSE SHIFTSSTATE, NATIONAL, TRANSNATIONAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . 551 DISCOURSE SHIFTSPUEBLOS 553 SHIFTS IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL DISCOURSE AND PRACTICE . 556 DISCOURSE SHIFTS: LANGUAGES OF POLITICAL PRACTICE AND IMPLEMENTATION . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Indigenous Political Imaginaries . . 562 Customary Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 Indigenous Deployment of Culture 563 Identity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 FUTURE DIRECTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . 565FUTURE DIRECTIONS....
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2010 for the course LATIN AMER LAC SOC taught by Professor Leighpayne during the Winter '10 term at Oxford University.

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annurev.anthro.34.081804 - Indigenous Movements in Latin...

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