L6-Impulse

L6-Impulse - Momentum, Impulse, and Angular Momentum...

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Momentum, Impulse, and Angular Momentum Physics 7B - Lecture 6 Prof. John Conway
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Position Vectors We use a vector with one end at the origin to indicate a position in space: y x x ^ y ^ In fact the position vector may be a function of time!
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Writing Position/Velocity Vectors In the previous example, how do we write the position vector or velocity vector? x is changing, y is constant. ..we get y x x ^ y ^ h x = vt y = h
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Writing Position/Velocity Vectors how do we get the velocity vector? from calculus we know that to do it with vectors we simply keep track separately what happens in x and y:
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Writing Position/Velocity Vectors in our case we can get the velocity vector from the position vector y x x ^ y ^ v
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Momentum The product of the mass of an object and its velocity is its momentum y x x ^ y ^ Clearly since velocity is a vector, momentum is also a vector! m v _ p = mv _ _ r(t) _
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Weight versus Mass one component of the momentum is the mass of an object mass is not the same as weight! weight is the force of gravity on an object mass is how much stuff there is in the object don’t say “my car weighs 1000 kg” say instead “the mass of my car is 1000 kg” how much does your 1000 kg car weigh?
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Friction the interaction between two surfaces in contact results in a force opposing relative motion of those surfaces: friction the magnitude of the frictional force is greater for two surfaces not moving (static friction) than moving (sliding friction) we characterize the amount of friction using a dimensionless constant called the coefficient of friction (μ) example: block on table F f = F ext < μmg
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Elastic/Inelastic Collisions elastic: kinetic energy
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L6-Impulse - Momentum, Impulse, and Angular Momentum...

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