Prolog Tutorial 2

Prolog Tutorial 2 - s J.R.Fisher Table of Contents...

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s © J.R.Fisher Table of Contents Introduction 1. How to Run Prolog 2. Sample Programs -- Descriptions 2.1 Map colorings 2.2 Two factorial definitions 2.3 Towers of Hanoi puzzle 2.4 Loading programs, editing programs 2.5 Negation as failure 2.6 Tree data and relations 2.7 Prolog lists and sequences 2.8 Change for a dollar 2.9 Map coloring redux 2.10 Simple I/O 2.11 Chess queens challenge puzzle 2.12 Set of answers 2.13 Truth table maker 2.14 DFA parser 2.15 Graph structures and paths 2.16 Search 2.17 Animal identification game 2.18 Clauses as data 2.19 Actions and plans 3. How Prolog Works 3.1 Prolog derivation trees and choices 3.2 Cut 3.3 Meta-interpreters in Prolog 4. Built-in Goals 4.1 Utility goals 4.2 Universals (true and fail) 4.3 Loading Prolog programs 4.4 Arithmetic goals 4.5 Testing types 1
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4.6 Equality of Prolog terms, unification 4.7 Control 4.8 Testing for variables 4.9 Assert and retract 4.10 Binding a variable to a numerical value 4.11 Procedural negation, negation as failure 4.12 Input/output 4.13 Prolog terms and clauses as data 4.14 Prolog operators 5. Search in Prolog 5.1 The A* algorithm in Prolog 5.2 The 8-puzzle 5.3 alpha-beta search in Prolog 6. 6.1 A note about logic and XSB Prolog 6.2 Positive logic 6.3 Convert first-order logic to normal form 6.4 A normal rulebase meta-interpreter 6.5 Evidentiary soundness and completeness 6.6 Rule tree visualization using Java 6.7 Diagrams and logic 6.A Visual logic . .. archive opens in new window 7. Introduction to Natural Language Processing 7.1 Prolog grammar parser generator 7.2 Prolog grammar for simple English phrase structures 7.3 Idiomatic natural language command and question interfaces 8. Prolog Action Specifications and Prototyping 8.1 Action specification for a simple calculator 8.2 Animating the 8-puzzle using character graphics 8.3 Animating the blocks mover REFERENCES Make-a-choice Prolog Exam 2
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© J. R. Fisher Introduction Please notify the author before including a link to any of the pages in this tutorial. Permission to copy is denied. Permission to link is freely granted. Prolog is a logical and a declarative programming language. The name itself, Prolog, is short for PROgramming in LOGic. Prolog's heritage includes the research on theorem provers and other automated deduction systems developed in the 1960s and 1970s. The inference mechanism of Prolog is based upon Robinson's resolution principle (1965) together with mechanisms for extracting answers proposed by Green (1968). These ideas came together forcefully with the advent of linear resolution procedures. Explicit goal-directed linear resolution procedures, such as those of Kowalski and Kuehner (1971) and Kowalski (1974), gave impetus to the development of a general purpose logic programming system. The "first" Prolog was "Marseille Prolog" based on work by Colmerauer (1970). The first detailed description of the Prolog language was the manual for the Marseille Prolog interpreter (Roussel, 1975). The other major influence on the nature of this first Prolog was that it was
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2010 for the course CS 752 taught by Professor V during the Spring '10 term at Jaypee University IT.

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Prolog Tutorial 2 - s J.R.Fisher Table of Contents...

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