LM12-2 - Microbialinteractions Typesofsymbioticrelationships

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Microbial interactions • Types of symbiotic relationships • Some specific examples • Normal human microbiota 1
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Types of symbiotic relationships (Fig. 27.1) • Symbiosis is the living  together or close association  of 2 dissimilar organisms • mutualism -- 2 organisms live  together for mutual benefit  (both symbionts benefit) • commensalism -- neither  symbiont in a symbiotic  relationship is harmed,  typically one benefits • parasitism -- host is harmed,  but parasite benefits • predation -- predator kills and  consumes prey 2
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Mutualism: Nitrogen fixing by Rhizobia (Fig. 26.23) • (a) When bio-available  nitrogen is too low, plant  root cells release flavonoids  to attract bacteria • Bacteria chemotax to plant  roots, making NOD factors  that cause plant cell  division and root hair  curling • Bacteria invade plant cells,  divide and  eventually  differentiate into bacteroids  (non-growing, N 2  fixing)  3
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Nitrogen fixation in legumes (Fig. 26.23)
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LM12-2 - Microbialinteractions Typesofsymbioticrelationships

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