DEFINITION OF PRIVATIZITION

DEFINITION OF PRIVATIZITION - DEFINITION OF PRIVATIZITION:...

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Privatization (alternately "denationalization” or "disinvestment") is the transfer of ownership from the public sector (government) to the private sector (business). A transfer in the opposite direction could be referred to the nationalization or municipalization of some property or responsibility. The term is also sometimes used to refer to government subcontracting a service or function to a private firm. A multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. Very large multinationals have budgets that exceed those of many countries. Multinational corporations can have a powerful influence in international relations and local economies. Multinational corporations play an important role in globalization; some argue that a new form of MNC is evolving in response to globalization: the 'globally integrated enterprise'. Multinational corporate structure: Multinational corporations can be divided into three broad groups according to the configuration of their production facilities: Horizontally integrated multinational corporations manage production establishments located in different countries to produce the same or similar products. (example: McDonalds) Vertically integrated multinational corporations manage production establishment in certain country/countries to produce products that serve as input to its production establishments in other country/countries. (example: Adidas) Diversified multinational corporations manage production establishments located in different countries that are neither horizontally nor vertically nor straight, nor non-straight integrated. (example: Hp) Foreign direct investment (FDI) is defined as "investment made to acquire lasting interest in enterprises operating outside of the economy of the investor." [1] The FDI relationship consists of a parent enterprise and a foreign affiliate which together form a transnational corporation (TNC). In order to qualify as FDI the investment must afford the parent enterprise control over its foreign affiliate. The UN defines control in this case as owning 10% or more of the ordinary shares or voting power of an incorporated firm or its equivalent for an unincorporated firm; lower ownership shares are known as portfolio investment . In the years after the Second World War global FDI was dominated by the United States, as much of the world recovered from the destruction brought by the conflict. The US accounted for around three-quarters of new FDI (including reinvested profits) between 1945 and 1960. Since that time FDI has spread to become a truly global phenomenon, no longer the exclusive preserve of OECD countries. FDI has grown in importance in the global economy with FDI stocks now constituting over 20 percent of global GDP. . Types of FDI:
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2010 for the course ECONOMICS 322 taught by Professor H during the Spring '08 term at Kadir Has Üniversitesi.

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DEFINITION OF PRIVATIZITION - DEFINITION OF PRIVATIZITION:...

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