StormsDay5s - Damage from Hurricane Katrina, Aug 2005 1...

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Damage from Hurricane Katrina, Aug 2005 1 YouTube clip from National Geographic. Search on Hurricane Destruction (0.39) 2
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Fate of Some Oil Rigs Stuck under bridge 3 A. Description 1. Anatomy of a hurricane 2. Observations by satellite and radar 3. Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale B. Processes 4. Tropical cyclones: organized to create their own fuel 5. Formation & movement 6. Warm core systems: the key to long life C. Hazards 7. Storm surge: the atmosphere drives an ocean disaster 8. Hurricane prediction and safety 9. Hurricanes in Canada Prof. Roland Stull Earth & Ocean Sciences Dept., UBC Hurricanes 4
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Today’s Learning Goals Identify the components of a hurricane. Explain how hurricanes get and utilize heat energy, and why hurricanes can exist for weeks. List the requirements for hurricane existence, describe how hurricanes evolve, and what causes them to die. Describe the risks associated with hurricanes, and appropriate safety procedures. By the end of this period, you should be able to: 5 Storm Hazards Thunderstorm Hazards lightning tornado hail downpours (of rain) / local flooding downbursts (of air) / gustfronts Hurricane Hazards contain thunderstorms storm surge / coastal flooding high waves coastal erosion today 6
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7 Hurricane Floyd 14 Sep 1999 (from NASA GSFC) 8
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Size: • height = 15 km for both hurricanes & Tstorms. • diameter = 150 - 300 km for hurricanes. (compared to 15 km for Tstorms) from http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/newsroom/camex/photo0140.html 9 Horizontal Structure Hurricanes & typhoons are tropical cyclones, with surface winds turning counterclockwise (in N. Hem.) & spiraling in. Eye = center of hurricane • relatively clear • relatively calm • low pressure at sea level Hurricanes are made of thunderstorms: • eye wall = ring of thunder- storms around the eye. • spiral bands = bands of Tstorms extending out from the eye wall. eye eye wall of thunder bands storms R Simplified Diagram of a Hurricane R is radial distance from center of the eye, and arrows represent wind direction near the ocean surface. Gray represents bands of thunderstorms. 10
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eye outflow inflow intense T-storms rain rain trade cumulus eye wall subsidence cirrus stratus spiral band stratosphere troposphere warm sea surface Vertical Cross-section Through a Hurricane 11 The Eye Wall, a Ring of Tstorms Radar image, made from HRD aircraft in Isabel.
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2010 for the course EOSC 114 EOSC 114 taught by Professor Stull during the Spring '10 term at UBC.

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StormsDay5s - Damage from Hurricane Katrina, Aug 2005 1...

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