Mill - UTILITARIANISM

Mill - UTILITARIANISM - UTILITARIANISM by JohnStuartMill...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
UTILITARIANISM by John Stuart Mill (1863)  Chapter 2 What Utilitarianism Is.   The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle,  holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to  produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain;  by unhappiness, pain, and the privation of pleasure. To give a clear view of the moral standard set  up by the theory, much more requires to be said; in particular, what things it includes in the ideas  of pain and pleasure; and to what extent this is left an open question. But these supplementary  explanations do not affect the theory of life on which this theory of morality is grounded- namely,  that pleasure, and freedom from pain, are the only things desirable as ends; and that all desirable  things (which are as numerous in the utilitarian as in any other scheme) are desirable either for  the pleasure inherent in themselves, or as means to the promotion of pleasure and the prevention  of pain.  Now, such a theory of life excites in many minds, and among them in some of the most estimable  in feeling and purpose, inveterate dislike. To suppose that life has (as they express it) no higher  end than pleasure- no better and nobler object of desire and pursuit- they designate as utterly  mean and grovelling; as a doctrine worthy only of swine, to whom the followers of Epicurus were,  at a very early period, contemptuously likened; and modern holders of the doctrine are  occasionally made the subject of equally polite comparisons by its German, French, and English  assailants.  When thus attacked, the Epicureans have always answered, that it is not they, but their accusers,  who represent human nature in a degrading light; since the accusation supposes human beings  to be capable of no pleasures except those of which swine are capable. If this supposition were  true, the charge could not be gainsaid, but would then be no longer an imputation; for if the  sources of pleasure were precisely the same to human beings and to swine, the rule of life which  is good enough for the one would be good enough for the other. The comparison of the Epicurean  life to that of beasts is felt as degrading, precisely because a beast's pleasures do not satisfy a  human being's conceptions of happiness. Human beings have faculties more elevated than the  animal appetites, and when once made conscious of them, do not regard anything as happiness  which does not include their gratification. I do not, indeed, consider the Epicureans to have been 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

Mill - UTILITARIANISM - UTILITARIANISM by JohnStuartMill...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online