M4-NeuralSystems

M4-NeuralSystems - with cell bodies in the brain or spinal...

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Neural Systems 1 1. A Single Neuron 1. Cell body, dendrite, and axon 2. Sensory, motor, and interneurons 3. Afferent vs efferent 4. Glial cells 2. Neuronal transmission 1. Action potential and resting potential 2. Synapse and neurotransmitters 3. Excitation and inhibition Neural Systems 2 1. 1. Central Nervous System (CNS) 2. Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) 1. Somatic vs autonomic 1. Sympathetic vs Parasympathetic The Neuron Axon Terminal endings (boutons) Dendrites Cell Body Nodes of Ranvier Nucleus Myelin Sheath (Soma)
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Types of Neurons Motor Neuron of the Spinal Cord Neuron in Cerebral Cortex Axon Sensory Neurons ± attached to specialized receptor cells that can pick up external energy, such as pressure, heat, or light, and thereby transduce the outside world into chemical and electrical changes in the nervous system Motor Neurons ± attached to specialized effector cells (muscles) which they control, typically
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Unformatted text preview: with cell bodies in the brain or spinal cord and long axons that reach out to muscles. Firing of a motor neuron causes a chemical event that results in muscle movement Interneurons ± neurons that connect other neurons, but are not themselves sensory or motor neurons Resting & Action Potentials ± resting potential = the standard negative charge (-70 mv) of a neuron at rest ± action potential = the reversal of polarity that occurs when a a neuron reaches the threshold of excitation (-60 mv) and fires ± refractory period = a brief period of inactivity that prevents re-firing for a couple of msec The Action Potential Recording the Impulse The Action Potential Travels… Ion Movement The Synapse Excitation & Inhibition Structure of the Nervous System The Nervous System...
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2010 for the course PSYCH PSYCH 101 taught by Professor D during the Fall '09 term at Waterloo.

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M4-NeuralSystems - with cell bodies in the brain or spinal...

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