lecture1-introduction

lecture1-introduction - 8/27/2009 Introduction to...

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8/27/2009 1 Introduction to Introduction to CS Section 000: Eugene Agichtein Your Instructor: Prof. Eugene Agichtein y Sept 2006-: Assistant Professor in the Math & CS department y Affiliate Faculty, Linguistics, Computational Life Science y Affiliate Faculty, Web Science Program and Health Systems Institute @ Georgia Tech y Summer 2007: Visiting Researcher at Yahoo! Research y 2004 to 2006: Postdoctoral Researcher at Microsoft Research Text Mining, Search, and Navigation group, and MSN Search/Live y 1998-2004: Ph.D. in Computer Science from Columbia University : dissertation on extracting structured relations from web-scale document repositories y 1994-1998: B.S. in Engineering from The Cooper Union .
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8/27/2009 2 Who are you, and why are you here? Please state <your name> Your year and major (if you have one) Fill in the blank: I think Computer Science is _________ What is Computer Science?
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8/27/2009 3 Let AB and CD be the two given numbers not relatively prime. It is required to find the greatest common measure of AB and CD . Slide credit: David Evans at University of Virginia If now CD measures AB , since it also measures itself, then CD is a common measure of CD and AB . And it is manifest that it is also the greatest, for no greater number than CD measures CD . Euclid’s Elements, Book VII, Proposition 2 (300BC) By the word operation, we mean any process which alters the mutual relation of two or more things, be this relation of what kind it may. This is the most general definition and would include al Slide credit: David Evans at University of Virginia the most general definition, and would include all subjects in the universe. .. Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations the engine might compose elaborate adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.
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lecture1-introduction - 8/27/2009 Introduction to...

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