npb 15 - NPB 107 February 24, 2009 1. 1. 1. 1. Taste intro...

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NPB 107 February 24, 2009 1. Taste intro 1. Taste via GPCRs 1. Taste via Trp channels 1. Thermosensation
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Evaluate nutritious content of food Prevent ingestion of poisons Sweet: energy-rich nutrients Umami: amino acids Salty: to maintain electrolyte balance Sour/bitter: warn against noxious/poisonous substances Coding is more complex than odorant receptors: taste receptor cells express more than one “tastant” receptor Taste
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4600 taste buds per tongue 1120 fungiform (sweet, salty) 1280 foliate (sour) 2200 circumvilate (bitter) 2500 additional taste buds on the epiglottis, soft palate, laryngeal and oral pharynx Number declines with age The Major Taste Tissue-the Tongue
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Taste Bud Taste receptor cell - has peg-like extensions projecting into taste pore. These contain the sites of sensory transduction. Basal cells - these differentiate into new receptor cells. They are derived from surrounding epithelium. The cells are continuously renewed every 10 days or so.
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Taste buds in tongue Immunostaining for Gusducin, a novel taste bud-specific heterotrimeric G protein Fig. 32.13 th Edition Taste Bud Pictorial
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Tastant receptors-sweet Sweet: T1R1, T1R2, T1R3 (GPCRs, Class C mGluR/pheromone receptor family) Taste receptor cells express T1R1 + T1R3, T1R2 + T1R3, and T1R3 alone T1R2 + T1R3: responds to all sweet tastants, including natural sugars, artificial sweeteners (e.g., saccharin) Humans and mice differ: mice cannot sense aspartame, introduce human T1R2 and now they can.
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2010 for the course NPB 105 taught by Professor Fuller during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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npb 15 - NPB 107 February 24, 2009 1. 1. 1. 1. Taste intro...

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