1_SevereWeather_II_Notes

1_SevereWeather_II_Notes - 1 2 The National Climatic Data...

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The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) tracks the nation’s losses from meteorological hazards. In NCDC’s listing of billion dollar events, severe weather was the cause for 27 billion dollar events (out of 90 events) between 1980 and 2008. According to NCDC, severe weather accounts roughly for about one third of the nation’s major disasters. When taking all types of natural hazards into consideration (i.e. including earthquakes, landslides, etc.), severe weather makes up 34% (or $140 billion) of the country’s monetary, direct losses suffered between 1960 and 2007 (according to SHELDUS 6.2). This makes severe weather cause more damage than hurricanes and tropical storms (27% or 136 billion), floods (15% or $75 billion) or geophysical events such as earthquakes (11% or $57 billion)! 3
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Costs and losses to agricultural and livestock producers Reduced yields and crop loss Injuries or loss of livestock Damage to barns and other farm buildings Damage to farm machinery Damage to wood fences Loss from timber production Damage to trees resulting in increased susceptibility to disease Urban, residential, and commercial Damage to and destruction of buildings Roofs Windows Siding, stucco, brick, and other exterior building materials Loss of trees and landscaping Damage to automobiles, trucks, trains, airplanes, etc. Disruptions to local utilities and services Power Communications Transportation Health Injuries Fatalities Mental and physical stress General economic effects Revenue loss from lost production in business and industry Negative impact of economic multipliers 4
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Hail storms are costly – particularly to farmers and the agricultural industry. Among others (see previous slide), hail causes crop loss and maybe even loss of livestock with the potential of higher food prices for the rest of the nation. 5
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6 Loss of life and injuries can be avoided when heeding timely issued warnings. Seeking shelter is an easy way to avoid risking one’s life and by moving equipment indoors people can avoid damage to machinery, cars, etc. Building material that can withstand impact protects properties not only during hail events but also during tornadoes or hurricanes.
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types together with heat and winter weather. Approximately 70 people die from lightning strikes and about 300 are injured on an annual basis. Property and agricultural damage associated with lightning is mostly fire-related, i.e. house or wildfires. Interrupted power supply by severe thunderstorms and lightning is responsible for indirect losses (e.g. lost revenue). On rare occasions, lightning strikes can take down an airplane although high winds are a much bigger concern for air traffic (see downbursts). 7
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1_SevereWeather_II_Notes - 1 2 The National Climatic Data...

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