Floods_II_notes

Floods_II_notes - 1 2 This map shows significant floods...

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This map shows significant floods during the 20 th century. Floods are one of the costliest and deadliest natural disasters in the U.S. Floods can occur at any time of the year, in any part of the country, and at any time of the day or night. Most lives are lost when people are swept away by flood currents, whereas most property damage results from inundation by sediment-laden water. Flood currents also possess tremendous destructive power, as lateral forces can demolish buildings and erosion can undermine bridge foundations and footings leading to the collapse of structures. The above map and table (next slide) describe 32 of the most significant floods of the 20th century Thi events include riverine and flash flooding most significant floods of the 20th century. This events include riverine and flash flooding as well as flooding due to storm surge, landslides, ice-jams, and dam failures. Source: http://ks.water.usgs.gov/pubs/fact-sheets/fs.024-00.html 3
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2/11/2010 4
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Following several months of unusually heavy rain during late 1926 and early 1927, the Mississippi River flooded. During the height of the flood, the river was over 80 miles wide at some locations. After the failure of a levee at Mounds Landing, Mississippi, the flooding river flowed with the force of Niagara Falls. The levee failure eventually resulted in the flooding of an area the size of Connecticut. Ten feet of water covered towns up to 60 miles away from the river. Even after 5 weeks, the area around Mounds Landing was covered with 100 feet of water. In the end, the Flood of 1927 affected an area of 27,000 square miles, about the size of all the New England states combined Over 130 000 homes were lost and about the size of all the New England states combined. Over 130,000 homes were lost and 700,000 people were displaced. 246 flood-related deaths were reported. Property damage was estimated at 350 million dollars, equivalent to approximately 5 billion dollars today. Many assume that the black exodus from the South to the North had to do with the Civil War or, later, the legal racial discrimination which was so prevalent. Not the vast majority. It was the 1927 flood, which left a devastated economy and destroyed the infrastructure in the Mississippi Delta, and particularly on the east bank all the way up beyond St. Louis. One of the most tragic events of the 1927 flood was the dynamiting of the levee at Caernarvon, LA to save New Orleans. Source: http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/investigations/es1308/es1308pa ge05.cfm 5
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Following the Great Flood of 1927, the Army Corps of Engineers was again charged with taming the Mississippi River. Despite all efforts that started before the turn of the century, the Army Corps could not control the Mississippi River. Since engineers were confident in their ability to tame the river, they were charged with resuming flood control work and structural flood mitigation. Under the Flood Control Act of 1928, the world's longest system
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2010 for the course DSM 2000 taught by Professor Romolo during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Floods_II_notes - 1 2 This map shows significant floods...

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